opinion

Bagpipe and its Fake Differences

These past few years, race has emerged as a topic of discussion in Highland Park, a community whiter than a marshmallow. One reason is the influx of minorities; thankfully, HP is gradually getting more diverse as time goes on. However, not all are receptive to this change. There have been numerous incidents of overt racism, ranging from hate crimes to petty remarks. This became the exigence for the Bagpipe‘s (our school’s newsmagazine) largest endeavor yet, a long-form about race.

The idea is noteworthy. Brave. To broach this ugly topic in such an unwelcoming neighborhood takes some otherworldly chutzpah. The execution? Botched would be an understatement.

Instead of pulling back the curtains of ignorance and negligence, the piece added more and more curtains, hiding a stage for students of color to honestly talk about racism in their home. The majority of students interviewed provided little, if any, substantial insight on this matter; what was written included not urgency and passion, but lassitude and nonchalance. Given the elevated socioeconomic background of most of those in the profile, racism ceases to become a major factor in quality of life. That’s not the case in everywhere else in the U.S. It is understandable that some of these Scots of color didn’t add much to the public discourse on racism in the modern era, but noxious aftereffects lie latent. White readers might be convinced that racism doesn’t exist in 2017 after all, given the lame answers in the article, more likely to perpetuate racial discord with a complete lack of understanding of the topic of racism. This is dangerous to everyone, not just Americans of color. Such illiteracy will only snowball, encouraging the continuation of the decades of racism and intolerance that plague the Park Cities and the United States as a whole. The future generation of America must understand the far-reaching repercussions of racism and be willing to act to ameliorate unequal social and political conditions for minorities.

What’s even more concerning is the inadvertent limelight on Asian stereotypes. As grade-grubbing. As nerds. As incompetent in social skills. As foreigners, outsiders, those who are so different from the rest of “us.” This not only hinders Asian-Americans’ easing into the American cultural tapestry but also misrepresents an entire race. Millions of people–completely different in class, gender identity, sexual orientation, social and academic background and affiliation–suffer from this myth, and this article will surely not help out with unifying Americans and promoting racial equality and mutual understanding.

We need some chicken noodle soup for the soul in order to make a dent in this centuries-old juggernaut. What does that entail? Dialogue, empathy, and an open heart.

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